58 Differences Between British And American English That Still Confuse Everyone.

To be honest, it's starting to feel like British English and American English are not the same language anymore. To quote George Bernard Shaw, the United States of America and the UK are "two countries divided by a common language." They can still understand each other, but the marked differences between the two varieties are growing steadily with each generation that in a few years they are going to be mutually unintelligible. One of the most notable and confusing differences, besides pronunciation, is at the level of vocabulary. Grammar Check visualized these differences in a beautiful infographic that we broke down here for you. Have a good read 😊

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Comments

  1. in the UK its whisky or Whiskey depending on whether its Scotch whisky or Irish whiskey

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep. There’s a few times we’d use both like apartment or flat. And we use path for sidewalk or pavement. (I’m Ireland at least)

      Delete
  2. University/College. Pissed/Drunk

    ReplyDelete
  3. UK - Neighbour /neighbor - US
    Colour/color
    Tyre/tire
    Rubbish/trash

    ReplyDelete
  4. All this shows is people don't really know that in the UK we don't all speak the same different areas say different things

    ReplyDelete
  5. Americans go Horseback riding. In the U.K. we already know where to sit on the Horse LoL :-)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm from New England and we say a number of words listed as British: fish and chips or chicken and chips, tap, trousers (my father was a tailor), pub, rubbish, public toilet, sweets, wardrobe, dungarees, tube, taxi, mad (for insane), railway, number plate, (not as often but you will hear tin instead of can, like a tin of anchovies), pavement, handbag, motorbike.

    ReplyDelete

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